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Thanks to your support, we've reached 115,000 signatures on our campaign against the Trans-Pacific Partnership and its invasive Internet provisions. That's 115,000 citizens worldwide who won't stand for a restricted Internet, won't allow the collection of our private data and won't put up with harsh criminalized fines for everyday users.

We're amplifying our 115,000 voices and we're not done yet. Help us put the TPP's Internet trap to bed by signing and sharing our petition at StopTheTrap.net.

TPP to bed

When the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) was rejected earlier this year in European Parliament, many had hoped that it would signal the end for its intrusive copyright legislation. Instead, these Internet restrictions live on through the Canada-EU Trade Agreement.

Help call on the pro-Internet community to stand against these closed-door treaties and sign the Declaration for Internet Freedom.

With Canada and Mexico formally joining the Trans-Pacific Partnership free trade negotiations, the number of countries impacted by the secretive Internet provisions of the TPP has increased to 11. More importantly, the citizens of those nations affected could have their personal data compromised, online access restricted and Internet actions criminalized.

Speak out for your Internet freedom at OpenTheTPP.net.

The International Telecommunications Union (ITU), a United Nations organization representing 193 countries, is developing proposals that could reverse Internet accessibility and legitimize undemocratic practices.

Speak out against these continued threats to our Internet use and sign the Declaration of Internet Freedom at http://openmedia.org/declaration.

This just in: OpenMedia will be joining leading Internet Freedom advocates and experts from Canada, the U.S., New Zealand, and Australia on Reddit on October 24th, 9 AM -  7 PM ET - taking your questions via their Ask Me Anything (AMA) section. The topics are the future of the Internet and the TPP.

Canada has now been formally admitted into the closed-door negotiations of the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a trade agreement that could lead to harsh restrictions on Internet use and fines for everyday citizens.

Learn more about the TPP and how it could affect Internet users worldwide at StopTheTrap.net. Read more about Canada's entry into the negotiations at The Vancouver Sun.

Canada TPP

During the revolutions in the Arab World since December 2010, standing government's fates were determined partly by the ability of their people to communicate via online tools and mobile phones. Whenever an uprising started in a new territory, dictators and government officials scrambled to halt the ability for protestors to communicate in many different ways. Other governments looked on fearfully at how their colleagues were coping or failing to address the challenge posed by the internet, hoping to maybe learn a best-practice or two in digital repression.

As the International Telecommunication Union’s December negotiations move closer, more worrying developments are coming to light. We recently posted about some of the main concerns raised by the secretive negotiations, which threaten to change the Internet as we know it.

Have you told everyone you know about the TPP's Internet trap?

The head of the Motion Picture Association of America has claimed that the copyright legislation within the Stop Online Piracy Act is "dead", but a similar threat to our free speech and Internet use lives on in the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement. 

Learn more about the TPP at StopTheTrap.net and read more on this story at Ars Technica.

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